464: B737 MFD & EICAS Released

The B737 MFD (Multi-Function Display) and EICAS (Engine Indicating and Crew Alerting System) are now ready.   Probably don’t need explanations from me about what they are.
   
Just one thing to note about the MFD: NO waypoints and airports will be shown on the display due to limitations of the Flight Instrument Panel (FIP) itself.  However, all other features found on the expanded and circular models are virtually implemented.

Current users of the B737 PFD could contact me for a 20% off discount if interested in these two gauges.  Others please visit my store.

My next project Continue reading

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463: B737 PFD Released

The B737 PFD has just been released.   It is so far the most complicated FIP gauge I’ve ever made, even with the experience I had from the Garmin G5 PFD.

Those who purchased it should have the download link in their mailboxes by now.  For the MFD and EICAS I showed in the previous post, they should be ready in the next few days.   Continue reading

462: B737 PFD Photo Preview

The bug checking and fine-tuning for the B737 PFD (Primary Flight Display) is completed.   Following is a photo (click to enlarge) of it with the coming EICAS (Engine Indicating and Crew Alerting System) and MFD (Multi-Function Display) sitting next to it.
I feel excited too and the PFD should be ready by end of the week as scheduled. Continue reading

461: B737 PFD to be Released Soon

In the last few weeks, I’ve been working hard on the Primary Flight Display (PFD) for the FSX default B737.   The development is based on the feedback from users, especially G5 PFD users, who want somethings truly matching the B737.

The gauge is generally completed with all the features found on the default B737 PFD, such as warning bars and displays for maximum and minimum speeds, decision height and altitude, etc.

At present, codes and functions are being optimized.   It is expected to be ready within the next two weeks. Continue reading

460: B737 Gauges Now PMDG Compatible

Last week, a user of my default FSX B737 Flaps Indicator in Italy asked if the gauge could be modified to cope with the PMDG B737.  Since there were similar requests, I finally made a purchase of the aircraft to check the possibility.

After some modifications, the Flaps Indicator and Wet compass of the B737 gauges are now compatible with the PMDG 737 via extra versions customized for  
the aircraft.   However, the back light effect recently implemented on the B737 gauges is still ONLY good for the FSX Default B737. Continue reading

459: My Cockpit Rebuilding #6


My Post 111 described the swapping of toggle switches on the Saitek Panel to make them easier to be identified in a dim environment.   On my new Yoke, I have the toggle switches “color-coded” with heat shrinkable tubes.

The modification is a lot simpler and meet the same purpose.   And it prevents, or to the least covers up, oxidation on the switch handles.   Also, they are cheap and easy to replace if worn out. Continue reading

458: Speed Brake on Mooney Bravo ASI

Thanks to Kenneth Quinn in the US who requested an indication for the Speed Brake engagement on the Mooney Bravo.  Now the feature is implemented on the airspeed indicator accordingly.

Users of the Mooney Bravo gauges should have received the update in their mailboxes by now.   If not, send me an email or notify me in the Comment section below.

 

457: My P3Dv4 Setting Up #6 – A New Practical Aircraft Migration

When I was reinstalling A2A aircraft for P3Dv4, I grumbled what the heck the developers are doing in altering the aircraft installation folder from “SimObjects” to “Prepar3D v4 Add-ons” under Documents.  But after reviewing the file hierarchy further, I have to admit that it is in fact a nice user-friendly touch.

The move not only avoids the chance of messing up with original files in P3D, but it also can eliminate the need of reinstalling aircraft after P3D is forced to clean install again for whatever reasons or when update is available.

Under the new structure, the P3Dv4-ready A2A installer (in my case) added the aircraft location to the “add-ons.cfg” in the Prepar3D.cfg directory after
installation.  Then created an XML file called “add-on.xml“, which contains all the sub-folder information, in the root directory of the aircraft folder as well.

Since these two files Continue reading

456: A PC Building Guide for Beginners

Many of us bought pre-assembled PCs for flight simulation from brand-names, like HP, Dell.   I did the same until one day I stepped forward to build one myself.

Frankly speaking, the first time was scary.   Fortunately, I had done a lot of preparations; the work turned out to be far less difficult than anticipated.
Above is “A Complete How To PC Building Guide for Beginners” from MSI, which I found universally good.   Definitely worth a favorite entry in your browser.